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Best Management Practices

Compost BMPs consist of three methods for using compost to improve water quality. These methods reduce the amount of stormwater that can enter waterways by increasing the amount of water that can infiltrate the soil. They do so through the creation of barriers that stop the water from flowing or cover the soil completely. The three compost BMPs include:

  • Compost blanket (PDF): A layer of loosely applied compost that is placed on the soil in disturbed areas to control erosion and retain sediment resulting from sheet flow runoff. Compost blankets are used in place of sediment and erosion control tools such as mulch, netting, or chemical stabilization.
  • Compost filter stock (PDF): A mesh tube filled with compost that is placed perpendicular to sheet flow runoff to control erosion and retain sediment in disturbed areas. The filter sock can be used in place of a sediment and erosion control tool such as a silt fence.
  • Compost filter berm: A dike of compost that is placed perpendicular to sheet flow runoff to control erosion in disturbed areas and retain sediment. It can be used in place of a sediment and erosion control tool such as a silt fence. The base of the berm is generally twice the height of the berm.


STA Certified Compost

The STA Certified Compost program requires that compost manufacturers provide customers with STA’s Compost Technical Data Sheets (CTDS), which includes feedstocks and instructions for use.  We have categorized feedstocks into different types of materials.

Food Scraps Diversion

In all, based on results of a survey conducted in 2016/17, USCC’s official magazine and partner, BioCycle, identified 869 compost facilities processing food scraps along with yard trim or some other material.; a 2017 survey identified 148 communities running curbside collection programs with food scrap and 67 collecting at drop-off locations.

Description: oranges-in-compost

USCC’s Position on the Food Recovery Hierarchy

The US Composting Council supports the Food Recovery Hierarchy developed by the US EPA, which directs that society should first reduce surplus food by source reduction (better management of food to diminish leftovers); then food scrap should be directed to use by people, then by animals, next for industrial purposes, such as rendering and energy recovery, then for compost.

For this reason the USCC partners with allied organizations for collaborative solutions to food recovery challenges.

We also endorse the Food Waste Reduction Hierarchy developed by the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.

Institute of Local Self Reliance Food Waste Hierarchy

 

Description: food-recovery-hierarchy50% by 2030

The US Composting Council was a cosigner on a recent letter sent by a group of influential organizations urging the federal government to turn more attention towards food recovery. The US Environmental Protection Agency and US Department of Agriculture announced shortly after its new goal: 50% recovery by 2030.